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Today at the Child Rape Royal Commission the nation was confronted with some sobering – in fact horrifying – statistics detailing the prevalence of child abuse within the Anglican Church in Australia during the 25 year period from 1980 – 2015.

The figures tendered revealed that a staggering 1 115 complaints of abuse – and let’s stop pretending that is spade is not a spade, and start calling ‘abuse’ what any Average Australian would agree that sexual violation of a child actually is: RAPE – .were made to the Anglican Church during that two and half decades.

Based on these figures alone, over the past 35 years a different child in the care of the Anglican Church was sexually abused – RAPED – every eleven days.

A child raped every eleven days. It’s staggering isn’t it? If it were a conflict between armed states this form of atrocity would no doubt be declared a war crime. But this isn’t a conventional war; it’s a massacre. A terrifying, premeditated attack on over a thousand unarmed and unsuspecting wide-eyed innocents.

An Australian child – one of our kids, a future doctor or engineer or perhaps even the scientist destined to discover the cure for cancer – has been raped every 11 days and their futures, and ours, destroyed: yet this horror passed by the public eye with barely a single shout of rage to drown out the screaming silence of the dead and the dead inside..

The collective silence of all in this lad girt by sea casts an ugly stain scar upon our golden soil that unless attended to immediately will take generations to remove.

I haven’t written a great deal on this website lately, because my attention has been focused on a project I’ve been working on to determine the actual numbers of children who were sexually attacked (RAPED) in the institutions examined in the case studies of the Royal Commission,  and then identify those who have died prematurely – predominantly at their own hand-  the end goal being to create something of beauty as a tribute to the lives of the victims, and a lasting memorial to our tragic loss of innocence and innocents, an object or space of contemplation, on a far smaller scale but of similar intent as the garden at Flanders Field

The analogy is apt.

One in seven Australian soldiers who left our shores and crossed the jeweled sea to fight in World War 1 never returned. There are statues and plinths, and gardens and memorial parks in towns and cities across the length and breadth of the wide brown land that commemorate their lives, their sacrifices and their deaths. Lest we forget.

Let me share a secret with you.

In the two institutions featuring in Royal Commission case studies that I have researched so far – both secondary schools – the early death rate among survivors is one in seven.

The same as the death rate in the war to end all wars.

They don’t tell you that at the Royal Commission do they?

Lest we forget.

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